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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey: First Page Mondays

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Really sorry I get late almost all the time in the Monday morning posts :( I think one of my new year resolutions needs to be that I am more punctual and regular with my posts.....

I read and obviously loved The 5th Wave and was waiting for the second book to come out. Here it is, The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey.

Check out what the first page says....

THERE WOULD BE no harvest.

The spring waves woke the dormant tillers, and bright green shoots sprang from the moist earth and rose like sleepers stretching after a long nap. As spring gave way to summer, the bright green stalks darkened, became tan, turned golden brown. The days grew long and hot. Thick towers of swirling black clouds brought rain, and the brown stems glistened in the perpetual twilight that dwelled beneath the canopy. The wheat rose and the ripening heads bent in the praire wind, a rippling curtain, an endless, undulating sea that stretched to the horizon.

 At harvesttime, there was no farmer to
pluck a head from the stalk, rub the head between his callused hands, and blow the chaff from the grain. There was no reaper to chew the kernels or feel the delicate skin crack between his teeth. The farmer had died of the plague, and the remnants of his family had fled to the nearest town, where they, too, had succumbed, adding their numbers to the billions who perished in the 3rd Wave. The old house built by the farmer's grandfather was now a deserted island surrounded by an infinite sea of brown. The days grew short and the nights turned cool, and the wheat crackled in the dry wind.

 The wheat had survived the hail and lightning of the summer storms, but luck could not deliver it from the cold. By the time the refugees took shelter in the old house, the wheat was dead, killed by the hard fist of a deep frost.


- Debolina Raja Gupta